Archive for the ‘“Speech Snacks” target sounds’ Category

Trick or Treat Chocolate-Cherry-Pumpkin Bark–{with “SpeechSnacks” for /ch/}

ch chocolate pix

Autumn is, hands down, my favorite season!  I love the change in temperature, the falling leaves and all the traditions of the season, like hayrides, corn mazes and pumpkin picking.  I must admit, however, that Halloween is not my favorite holiday.  While I love the decorations and costumes–both cute and scary, I am not a fan of the trick or treat candy and snacks.   Although I’ve tried to  buy the less sugary snacks, like popcorn balls, chips and pretzels, the candy bars are always the first to go.  And if there are left overs, they always seem to make their way into the mouths of my family members–and even myself during a weak moment.  I recently discovered a delicious treat that is also a trick.  While it is made with chocolate–DARK chocolate that is, it is also packed full of antioxidants and other good stuff.  Your kiddos might just opt for this yummy treat instead of those high fat milk chocolate bars and gummy candies.   And if you have close friends and neighbors visiting on Halloween, package this candy in a clear, festive Halloween baggie and share it with them too.  Remember to tell your kids not to consume homemade candy or other products from people they do not know, always examine their treat bags before letting them eat any candy, and EVERYTHING IN MODERATION!  Happy Trick or Treating!!

Speech Snacks for the sound /ch/:

According to developmental charts, 90% of children produce this sound between  5-7 years of age.   To make the /ch/  sound, the lips are puckered and the back teeth are closed. The tongue tip is pressed against the gum ridge ( the bumpy part of the palate behind the  teeth).  Once the positioning is correct, the student needs to pull the tongue down and release a little puff of air.  To help get the tongue in the correct position, try placing a dab of peanut butter on the bumpy ridge or rub the ridge with the bristles of a toothbrush .

I show my students how to play “sound math” to help them make this sound.  Here’s how it works: T+SH=CH If you make these sounds, you’ll hear how they add up!  It’s a great way to break down the sound and blend its parts together.

To address this sound at the syllable level, we imitate the sound of a train, slowly and QUICKLY (“choo-choo!!”)  We also imitate the sound of a sneeze (ah-choo!)   We also  practice other syllables (cha, che, chi, cho, choo).  Once the syllable level is mastered, you can move on to /ch/ in words, phrases, sentences and finally conversational speech.  Here are some ways to address these levels:

GRAB YOUR FREE PRINTABLE CHOCOLATEY /CH/ GAME CARDS HERE!!!     Use them to  address the /ch/sound for articulation OR language goals —-(laminate all cards for better durability)

 

(Game was created using template and symbols from Custom Boards by Smarty Ears)

GAME OPTIONS:

*for ARTICULATION: make two copies of the chocolate words and play a matching game for addressing the /ch/ sound 

*for SEQUENCING AND MEMORY: using one copy of the cards , place cards in a pile, face down— players take turns choosing a card.  Each player must remember the word on the previous players cards, plus their own.  Keep the game going as long as players can keep remembering all the cards.

*for CATEGORIZATION: ask players to think of as many chocolate foods as they can.  Give them the cards for the ones they have named=1 point. Give them an extra point if they can think of other chocolate foods that there is no card for. 

 

How to address LANGUAGE SKILLS while making Trick or Treat Chocolate….

  • Ask your child–What makes the chocolate melt? COMPARE the solid chocolate to the melted chocolate.
  • Cut open a pumpkin and COMPARE the slippery, gooey pumpkin seeds to the dry roasted seeds from the store.  Try drying and roasting your own seeds in your oven.
  • Copy and cut out the photos of the recipe below and have your child retell the steps.  Mix up the order of the steps and ask him/her to re-sequence them, using key /ch/words practiced at the word and phrase level above.
  • Play the board game “Hi-Ho Cherry-O!” It has lots of fun opportunities to pick cherries off the tree and practice the /ch/ sound.

 

TO MAKE CHOCOLATE CHERRY PUMPKIN BARK:

For this recipe, use bittersweet chocolate, which is 60% cacao. The higher the percentage of cacao, the more antioxidants present in the chocolate!

 

Melt two 4 oz bars of bittersweet chocolate over very low heat, stir constantly. You can also use a double boiler to melt chocolate and avoid burning.

 

When melted, chocolate should be smooth, glossy and contain no lumps.

 

 

 

The micro-nutrients present in dried cherries include iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, folate, vitamin C and vitamin A (as beta-carotene). In fact, cherries have 19 times as much beta-carotene as blueberries and strawberries. Tart cherries have one of the highest levels of antioxidants of any fruit.  You can also substitute dried cranberries or raisins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkins are a great source of magnesium, protein, vitamin K, zinc, iron, and other important vitamins. One half cup of pumpkin seeds contains 92% of your daily value of magnesium.  You can purchase dry, roasted, shelled  pumpkin seeds in the bulk section of some supermarkets–(I purchased mine at Whole Foods)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add about 1/3-1/2  cup roasted, unsalted pumpkin seeds and 1/2 cup dried cherries (or raisins or cranberries) to the melted chocolate. Stir until well blended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Line a 9X9 inch glass dish with wax paper. Pour chocolate mixture into dish. Sprinkle 1/3 cup pumpkin seeds over the top. Set in refrigerator for a least 3 hrs or until chocolate has completely hardened. Remove from pan and break into pieces. If there is any left over, keep it refrigerated to prevent melting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facts about Dark Chocolate:

#1 Dark chocolate is good for your heart. A small bar of it everyday can help keep your heart and cardiovascular system running well. Two heart health benefits of dark chocolate are:

  • Lower Blood Pressure: Studies have shown that consuming a small bar of dark chocolate everyday can reduce blood pressure in individuals with high blood pressure.
  • Lower Cholesterol: Dark chocolate has also been shown to reduce LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) by up to 10 percent.

#2 Despite its sweet reputation, dark chocolate has a low glycemic index similar to that of oatmeal — meaning it does not send your blood sugar spiking.

#3 One bar of dark chocolate has around 400 calories. If you eat half a bar of chocolate a day, you must balance those 200 calories by eating less of something else. Cut out other sweets or snacks and replace them with chocolate to keep your total calories the same.

#4 Dark chocolate contains a large number of antioxidants (nearly 8 times the number found in strawberries). Dark chocolate has far more antioxidants than milk or white chocolate. These other two chocolates cannot make any health claims. Dark chocolate has 65 percent or higher cocoa content. You should look for pure dark chocolate or dark chocolate with nuts, orange peel or other flavorings. Avoid anything with caramel, nougat or other fillings. These fillings are just adding sugar and fat which erase many of the benefits you get from eating the chocolate.

#5 It may taste good but some research shows that washing your chocolate down with a glass of milk could prevent the antioxidants being absorbed or used by your body.

 

 Stories to Read with the /ch/ sound:

Chicken Soup with Rice by Maurice Sendak

Ah-Choo by Mercer Mayer

 

 

Pumpkin Parfait {with SpeechSnacks for Pick-a-Pumpkin Word Game}

pumpkin

 

Fall is a great time to introduce new and nutrient-dense foods and flavors to your kiddos.  With such a great variety of beautiful squashes in season, this is a great opportunity to sneak some important vitamins and minerals into their diets —namely, beta carotene which is found in pumpkin.  In addition, pumpkin is extremely high in fiber and low in calories,  contains disease-fighting nutrients, including potassium, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and vitamins C and E.   Although I love using pumpkin in my baked goods, I recently discovered a great way to use pureed pumpkin without cooking it.  (I used canned organic, pure pumpkin—do not use pumpkin pie mix for this recipe.)  This parfait  doubles as a breakfast or dessert for anyone who is itching for a fall-inspired treat!   Check out the amazing combination of healthy ingredients used to create this lovely autumn concoction and I think you will have a hard time deciding whether to eat it first thing in the morning or as a delicious treat to end your day.

I’ve created a Halloween-themed versatile game using templates and symbols from  Custom Boards by Smarty Ears

Print out the  PICK-A-PUMPKIN  game boards and use with a set of dice HERE!!!!

 

Each of the four pumpkin templates consists of a different set of words:  SET 1—Halloween ADJECTIVES, SET 2–Halloween NOUNS, SET 3–Present tense VERBS, SET 4—more Halloween NOUNS. 

GAME OPTIONS:

OPTION 1: Use the templates to address SENTENCES FORMATION.  Write a number in each circle from 1-9–on each template.  Roll the dice.  Pick the word that corresponds with the number on each template.  ie:  Template 1 : DREADFUL, Template 2: GOBLIN,  Template 3:   CACKLE,  Template 4: FOG.  Create a sentence from these words “The dreadful goblin cackled in the fog.”

OPTION 2:  AUDITORY MEMORY/SEQUENCING: Pick one word from each template and ask your students to repeat each word.  i.e. “ghoulish, bat, carve, demon”  You can add more words or use less depending on the ability level of the student.

OPTION 3: CATEGORIZATION:  Use each pumpkin template to BUILD VOCABULARY.  ie:  Name some more NOUNS that are Halloween words.  Name more DESCRIBING WORDS that are associated with Halloween.

OPTION 4: TARGET SPEECH SOUNDS:  Choose template picture symbols that contain speech sounds you may be addressing with students in therapy.

OPTION 5:  IDENTIFY PARTS OF SPEECH:  Randomly give your students  words from the templates and ask them to label the words with the correct part of speech: NOUN, ADJECTIVE, or VERB.

OPTION 6:  ELABORATE ON IDEAS/BUILD DESCRIBING SKILLS:  Use individual templates as “I Spy” game boards.  Ask your students to take turns describing and giving clues about the picture.  The rest of the group must guess which picture is being described. 

DO YOU HAVE ANOTHER WAY TO USE THE PUMPKINS TO ADDRESS SPEECH AND LANGUAGE GOALS???  I’D LOVE TO HEAR YOUR THOUGHTS! 

 

 

Overnight Pumpkin Parfait

Ingredients:

(these measurements yield ONE serving—increase accordingly!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • 1/3 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup 0% plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk (or milk of choice)
  • 3 Tbsp pure pumpkin puree
  • ground cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, & cloves to taste
  • 2 Tbsp honey or brown sugar
  • splash of pure vanilla extract
  • 1 large banana, peeled & sliced
  • 4 squares whole wheat graham crackers, (equivalent of 2 sheets)—I used cinnamon graham crackers for a little extra flavor 

Directions:

The night before you intend to eat the parfait, combine the oats, yogurt, milk, pumpkin, spices, and vanilla extract in a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap
and refrigerate overnight.

LET THE KIDDOS POUR AND MIX THE INGREDIENTS—-THEY WILL BE MORE LIKELY TO TRY NEW FOODS IF THEY CAN SEE, TASTE and, TOUCH WHAT YOU ARE MAKING—IT WILL TAKE SOME OF THE MYSTERY OUT OF ATTEMPTING NEW FOODS!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                  

 

 

Also the night before, place the banana slices in a Ziploc bag and freeze overnight.

COMPARE THE FROZEN BANANAS TO THE FRESH BANANAS.  TALK TO YOUNG CHILDREN ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE AND HOW /WHY THE BANANAS BECAME FROZEN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the morning, place the frozen banana slices into a food processor (or
high-speed blender) and process/blend until smooth and creamy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place the graham crackers into a plastic bag and crush with a skillet or
other heavy item until they turn into coarse crumbs.

WHAT FUN FOR KIDDOS (AND ADULTS TOO!)  USE A ROLLING PIN TO BREAK UP THE GRAHAM CRACKERS INTO SMALL PIECES

 

 

 

Layer the cold pumpkin spice oats with the banana soft serve and graham cracker crumbs.  Enjoy!

REVIEW ALL THE INGREDIENTS USED TO MAKE THIS HEALTHY AND DELICIOUS TREAT—SEE HOW MANY INGREDIENTS THE KIDS CAN RECALL AND WHICH SPICES THEY CAN IDENTIFY AS THEY EAT THEIR PARFAITS !!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This recipe idea was based on a post found at Healthy Foods For Living.  It has been modified to suit this blog.

 

Fall Fig Streusel {with Go “FIG”ure game for figurative language}

go figure

Many  Americans have never eaten a fresh fig—(blame fig newtons and dried figs)— those are NOTHING compared to a fresh fig.  A fresh fig tastes like a mix between  a peach and a strawberry.   This September I found a great use for my fresh figs that are growing like crazy on the Celeste fig tree in my backyard.  Figs can be eaten straight from the tree or used in a variety of appetizers, main courses and desserts.  Today I’m sharing a recipe for homemade fig streusel that will leave you wanting for more!      And if you would like to check out a great recipe that uses dried figs, read my post on Fig Bars from last September—and some great ways to incorporate the /f/ sound while cooking with your kids.   I give full credit to my Italian ancestry for my interest in growing fig trees.  I blogged about this a while back  and thought I’d share my cultural story with you here again.

This week’s therapy idea is a continuation of the “Listening theme” from my last post.   I created figurative language bingo cards (inspired by my fig recipe, the game is called Go “FIG”ure) that can be used to teach idioms associated with listening and communication.  I found pictures that represent the idioms in a very  literal and humorous way.

GO “FIG”ure Game Rules:

1–Each player gets  a bingo card (there are three layouts).  Grab them here.

2–Copy the bingo index/hat draw cards  included in the download—make three copies and cut out all cards.  Place cards into a pile or container.

3– Draw a card and cover the spot on your bingo sheet.  You can make this game “four corners”, “t-shape” , “full card”  or traditional— vertical, horizontal, diagonal.

4–When the card is draw, ask the student to read the idiom on the bingo sheet.  Explain the idiom by DEFINING/DESCRIBING IT, USING IT IN A SENTENCE and/or RECALLING A REAL-LIFE application of the expression— Ask your kiddos to try giving their own sentence for the idiom—This is a good way to apply their comprehension of the idiom in a practical way.    See my idioms sentence examples for use with this activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:  the images used for this bingo game are not the property of LessonPix

 

 

Fig Streusel

***Remember to use the photos included in the recipe portion as a sequencing activity AFTER you have finished making the recipe—-print them out and have your kids practice putting them in the correct order and recalling the details—a great way to work on comprehension and memory skills!!!

Ingredients

3/4 cup uncooked rolled oats
1/3 cup All-purpose flour
3 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar
 3 tablespoons softened butter
 3 cups quartered fresh figs*YOU CAN FIND FRESH FIGS IN THE PRODUCE SECTION OF SUPERMARKETS AND SPECIALTY MARKETS (such as Whole Foods and Italian markets)
1/2 teaspoon, ground cinnamon
1/4 cup skim milk
1 Egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Coat a Pyrex pie plate with cooking spray. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combine  oats, flour and brown sugar in a bowl. Add butter and blend them well.

THIS IS THE PERFECT OPPORTUNITY TO LET THE KIDDOS MEASURE, POUR AND MIX THE INDREDIENTS –let them use their hands!! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the coated pie plate and press half of the mixture into it.

LET THE KIDS PRESS THE MIXTURE INTO THE PIE PLATE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place the quartered figs in pie plate and sprinkle with cinnamon

HELP YOUR KIDS COMPARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE WHOLE FIG/OUTER SKIN TO THE INSIDE FLESH OF THE FIG 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combine  milk, eggs and vanilla and mix them well. Pour over the figs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprinkle the remaining crumb mixture over the top.

LET THE KIDS SPRINKLE THE REST OF THE CRUMB TOPPING OVER THE FIGS BEFORE BAKING

Bake for around 40 minutes until golden brown in color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let cool to room temperature. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream and a fresh fig on top!

 

 

Super Summer Soup Series Part III: {Squash Soup and S.Q.U.A.S.H. Listening Game}

squash

Late summer and early fall are squash season.  You’ll find them thriving in gardens and plentiful in supermarkets.  Varieties including butternut, acorn, spaghetti and yellow squash are curious looking and often appear intimidating to prepare, however they are all actually quite simple to cook and well worth the effort!  This week, I took the beautiful orange-yellow butternut squash that was growing in my mother’s garden and turned it into a thick, rich soup.  Although I am sad that summer will soon be a memory,  the squash soup was a pleasant reminder of late summer days and crisp fall evenings that are just around the corner.

As the school year begins, many of us who work with children know the importance of teaching good listening skills.  Without utilizing strategies for being a better listener in the classroom, vital information will be forgotten.  I have created a game for teaching listening strategies—inspired by squash soup!!  I call them SQUASH Listening Strategies and have provided acronyms that will assist  your students in remembering important key phrases that will help them be better listeners.  Acronyms are very successful ways of helping us remember key phrases and important facts.  Check out my SQUASH strategies and cut out the game cards included here.    While working on these strategies you can also educate your kiddos about several varieties of squash.  Bring in a few real squash to compare and contrast the differences while letting the kids see and feel them.  Can you think of your own acronym for SQUASH that will help improve good listening skills??

Game Rules:   Each student gets a SQUASH strategies sheet.  Cut apart all game cards and place in a pile or in a basket.  Take turns drawing cards.  If the card matches the letter and type of squash on your game sheet, cover the space.  If it doesn’t match, put it back in the pile.  Go again or lose a turn if you draw that card.  The first person to cover their game sheet first is the winner.  Practice repeating the listening strategies with your students.  Here are the SQUASH acronyms and what they stand for. Explain the meanings of the strategies as part of your lesson on good listening and review them often in your session!

SAVE YOUR QUESTIONS UNTIL ALL SPEAKERS HAVE FINISHED:  Explain the importance of listening to the entire message before interjecting comments or questions.  It is important to take in all the details of a speakers message to gain full understanding before asking questions or responding.

 

SPEND TIME QUIETLY LISTENING UNTIL THE DIRECTIONS ARE FINISHED, START TO REPEAT HOW MUCH YOU HEARD :  Reauditorize in your head or repeating directions quietly to yourself or aloud is an effective way to process and remember information.  It is  important to patiently listening before verbalizing the message.

 

SMART STUDENTS QUICKLY LEARN THAT USING YOUR 5 SENSES AND CONCENTRATING ON A SITUATION  WILL HELP YOU LISTEN FOR IMPORTANT INFORMATION :  When you listen with your five senses you take in information in many ways—you listen with your eyes (look at the speaker and observe his/her cues and body language) with your ears (to take in auditory input) with your whole body (by writing notes, touching any tools or instruments that a speaker may be explaining how to use) If you use your senses of touch and sight along with your sense of hearing, you will remember information longer!   

 

 Butternut Squash Soup 

Ingredients:

1 butternut squash, peeled and cubed

1 onion

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

5 cups chicken stock

salt and pepper to taste

nutmeg

brown sugar

1/2 cup milk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peel the tough outer skin of the squash–I use a carrot/potato peeler, scoop out the inner seeds and cube the squash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place the cubed squash on a large cookie sheet and roast in the oven at 400 degrees for approx 20 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a large pot, melt the butter.  Add the onion and  saute until translucent, about 8 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add 5 cups of chicken or vegetable broth to the pot with onions and bring to a simmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place roasted squash into a blender in small batches.  Add some of the broth from the soup pot.  Blend until smooth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add 1/2 cup milk and and 4 tablespoons of brown sugar to the mixture you are blending

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pour all blended ingredients back into pot.  Add a sprinkle of nutmeg salt and pepper to taste.  Let simmer for 20 minutes on low heat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy a warm bowl of squash soup with some crusty bread.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Soup Series Part II: Gazpacho Soup {with SpeechSnacks for “Idi-Yummy Idioms” card game}

idiom pixs

If you have more tomatoes growing in your garden than you know what to do with, then check out this week’s post—Part II of our Super Summer Soup Series!!  Nothing shouts of late summer more than the taste of fresh garden tomatoes.  This soup is meant to be consumed when cold—something that many of us may not be accustomed to, however once you have a taste of cold gazpacho soup, you’ll be sold on the fresh and refreshing change of pace and delicious summer flavors!  And what a great way to get the kids to experience so many different veggies all in one dish!  **If your kids have issues with textures, you can puree the ingredients instead of chopping to create a smoother soup. This week, I’ve added a card game for learning idioms—you know, those silly expressions,( also known as figurative language) that make our language colorful and fun.  They don’t actually translate literally, but stand for something else.  Hope you enjoy “Idi-Yummy Idioms,” inspired by various veggies.  I chose idioms that contained the names of vegetables.  Each idiom card has a matching definition card to go with it.  Play as a “GO FISH” card game or MATCHING game…get creative,  let the kiddos help decide how to use them!

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Summer Gazpacho Soup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve create sequencing cards using my Custom Boards app for the kiddos to practice verbal expression and organizing thoughts with FIRST, NEXT, LAST .  You can print out a copy (with larger print) here. 

This sequence is a “how-to” process for blanching and peeling tomatoes before using them in the soup.  I prefer to remove the skin from tomatoes for soups and sometimes salads to improve the texture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

5 large ripe tomatoes (blanched and peeled)

1 large cucumber, diced—I prefer English cucumbers which contain no seeds

1 large green bell pepper, diced

1 garlic clove, minced

1/2 red onion, diced

1 medium zucchini, diced

1/4 teaspoon chopped basil

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

4 cups LOW SODIUM tomato juice (I prefer to add salt to taste—-regular tomato juice is VERY high in sodium so watch out if you are looking to avoid the extra salt!)

dash hot pepper

salt and pepper to taste

chopped parsley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a large bowl, combine all vegetables. Stir in vinegar and olive oil. Add tomato juice and hot pepper. Blend well. Add salt and pepper to taste.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chill for several hours before serving!

 

 

 

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