Archive for the ‘“Speech Snacks” target sounds’ Category

Strawberries and Cream Tortilla Pizza {with “SpeechSnacks” for spatial concepts}

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Many of the recipes that I post are based on the wholesome, nutritious foods that I make for my family on a regular basis.   Other recipe posts are inspired by a speech or language concept I am working on with my students.  Still others are inspired by something delicious I tasted in a restaurant.  And many are based on an experience I may have had while visiting a particular destination.  Throughout the summer months you will be getting a taste of my family’s weekly trips to our farm.  Well, it’s not exactly all ours (although I do love the sound of that), but it is partially ours.  We are shareholders at a local farm that is part of an organization called Community Supported Agriculture or CSA–find out more about it here.   Over the last 20 years, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become a popular way for consumers to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmer.  A farmer offers a certain number of “shares” to the public.  Interested consumers purchase a share (or “membership” )and in return receive seasonal produce each week throughout the farming season.  Many of the vegetables are pre-picked for you, however our farm also includes u-pick fields which includes strawberries, peas, herbs and wild flowers.  What a great experience for your kids—-and a wonderful way to learn and build language concepts.  Take a look at the beautiful CSA farm we belong to here.

 

The past few weeks have been strawberry season at the farm, and boy were they sweet–and abundant.  We  had more than enough to enjoy in cereal, ice cream and  by the handful, and still more to freeze for later.   This week’s recipe was one more way to indulge in one of nature’s sweetest treats.   I have included ways to address language skills for vocabulary building, sequencing and spatial concepts in a fun video segment.  Check it out here!!  

I also created a little book called “Where’s the Strawberry?” that you can make with your preschoolers working on spatial concepts for ON, IN, BETWEEN, UNDER, ABOVE, IN FRONT, BEHIND.  Cut out the Strawberry Cards and have your kiddos glue them in the correct location on each page—grab it here!!

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Why Not Try Thai?! {with “SpeechSnacks” summer calendar activities!}

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The school year is finally coming to an end (and I mean we are literally counting the hours, minutes and seconds–you’d think it was New Year’s Eve and the ball was about to drop down the center of my family room) and the summer is approaching with great anticipation.   This level of excitement and enthusiasm is customary in my household which consists of a school age son, a speech therapist mom  and a school principal dad living under the same roof!   We are all so wrapped up in the land of academia all year long,  it’s no wonder we can’t wait for a brief respite for just a few glorious weeks!!  This summer we will be taking a well-deserved beach vacation and a few day trips, although after writing this post, I wanted to travel to a far away destination like Thailand.  I tried this incredible dish recently at a local Thai restaurant (my new favorite place to eat by the way), and was amazed by it’s simplicity.  It didn’t take long to figure out  how to recreate it in my own kitchen, although I did cross-reference a few recipe sites to see if I was on the right track.  Enjoy this  little taste of summer and the “speechsnacks” for this week— a summer calendar filled with many of the recipes and speech/language activities I have been posting all year.  I picked a few of the most popular ones and featured them on the calendar so you and your kiddos will have fun cooking together while practicing good speech and language all summer long!—Get your copy HERE!

 

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Buy (Make) Me Some Peanuts & Crackerjacks! {with SpeechSnacks for a baseball game!}

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With the baseball season in “full swing,” (sorry but the puns will be plentiful in this post!)  I was inspired to create a treat that was reminiscent of America’s  favorite past time. I researched several different versions of crackerjacks on recipe websites.  I thought some contained way too much sugar, others overdid it with butter.  After “striking out” with several versions, this recipe seemed “scored some points”  for having a conservative balance of sugar and butter without overdoing it.  I don’t think my family will ever go back to a box a cracker jacks at the ball park again….I may just try to sneak in this homemade concoction instead!  To go along with my baseball themed treat,  I created a baseball game that was versatile enough to use with both my language and speech kiddos.  And I found a baseball field/whiteboard app on my ipad to help us keep track of our game…the kids loved watching their game come to life with this simplistic visual. I used a tissue box to create a “batter’s box” which contained all our  playing cards…and it was an opportunity to explain another baseball term to the kids who didn’t know what a real batters box was.  This is a great snack for families to make at home or for SLP’s to make and bring in to school to share with students (please be sure to check for peanut allergies—omit peanuts if this presents an issue).   This treat and game activity are sure to “hit a home run” with your little sluggers—so let’s play ball!!

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Ladybug Salad—{with “SpeechSnacks” for /l/ sentences”

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Have you started planting your summer garden yet??  Will it be filled with flowers? Vegetables?  Both?  No matter what you decide to plant, you are sure to find lots of these little buggers in your flowers and veggies all season long—ladybugs!  So after I planted my flowers last week I was inspired to create a post that was seasonally appropriate, healthy, and a fun way to get the kids to try some fruits and veggies!  I recently discovered broccoli slaw in Trader Joe’s and have been using it to make salads every chance I get!  The ingredients double as a kid friendly “ladybug” salad and a crunchy, refreshing and sweet salad that grown ups will find satisfying as well.  I have also created my first post using Custom Boards by Smarty Ears (it was on sale this month for Better Hearing and Speech Month so I took full advantage.)  I LOVE this app for so many reasons—-you can create flashcards, game boards, worksheets…the possibilities are endless!!  Hope your speech kiddos working on /l/ at the sentence level find it fun and informative—not only will they be practicing their /l/, but learning some interesting facts about this cool creature as well!  And don’t forget to check out my fun video for ladybug salad—learn some math and spatial concepts while playing with your fruits and veggies!! Continue reading “Ladybug Salad—{with “SpeechSnacks” for /l/ sentences”” »

Truffula Trees!! {with SpeechSnacks for language building ideas}

PicMonkey Collage truffula

In my last post, I recycled produce containers and paper bags to create birds nests for a Spring language activity.  Today, I continue my tribute to Earth Day with my interpretation of Truffula Trees from the wonderful book and movie, “The Lorax,”  by Dr. Seuss.  I saw this movie with my son and walked away from it with a deeper respect and appreciation for  Mother Earth.  Truffula Trees are super easy to make in the classroom or at home.  Get creative with the tree trunks and experiment with different fruits.   And please send me your feedback and pictures too!!!….I’d love to know how your trees turned  out!  

 

TRUFFULA TREES!!!!

**always check for food allergies before making any hands-on projects  involving food (yes, even fruit!)

I am using blackberries and green grapes to construct the trunks of my trees. I think the textures of each and varied tastes of each fruit make the trees more interesting and fun to eat!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can find cotton candy in many of your local dollar stores and supermarkets. It looks a lot like the wispy tufts of the Truffula trees. Use sparingly–remember this is pure sugar—and some artificial coloring!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions to help elicit conversation while creating your trees in the classroom—-

What else does cotton candy remind you of in nature? 

Describe how cotton candy feels. 

What happens when you put it in your mouth (how does it change?)

What events is cotton candy sold at? 

FOR STORY COMPREHENSION: After reading the story with your students, check out these questions.   (most appropriate for upper elementary/middle school)

Search the book for words that contain speech sounds that your students are working on.  Have them repeat the words, phrases and sentences containing their speech sounds.

i.e.: for /l/ sound practice I came up with these words:

LORAX— TRUFFULA— BARBALOOTS— ONCE-LER— GRICKLE GRASS— UNLESS!

I used long cocktail stirrers to thread on my fruit. You can also use wooden skewers but don’t let your tree get too tall or it might not stand up for long!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long cocktail stirrers are rounded at the ends and safe for little hands to use!  Toothpicks are sharp so be careful if  you use them! 

No need to make them exactly as shown in the picture—Kids can determine how to pattern the “tree trunks.” 

Take a vote prior to purchasing your materials–ask your students to help you brainstorm a list of possibilities—-the two most popular items can be the ones you purchase–this will keep things simple and cost-effective for you!  

Some “tree trunk” possibilities: red grapes, strawberry chunks, raspberries, marshmallows…use your imagination!!   

I used a thick piece of Styrofoam and inserted my sticks into it to display my forest of truffula trees!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you come up with a list of different types of trees with your students?   

Go online and search for images of various trees.  Print them out and label them. 

Put your print outs into a binder or staple together to make a book of trees.  If your school is located on property that has surrounding trees, take a nature walk with your students (weather and season permitting!)and see how many you can identify from your book of trees.

If you spot a Truffula tree, please be sure to take a picture and send it to me!!!    

(photo credit: Dr. Seuss)

 

 

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